Stonehenge Casting How-To: Filling out ALL your measurements

Posted on September 7, 2015 by admin

With the actor registration for Stonehenge XIV about to close this Saturday, 9/12, this seems like an appropriate time to go over filling out your measurements on your Stonehenge Casting actor/performer profile. You need to fill out all 12 measurement fields to make your profile 100% complete. Otherwise, you could wind up with the wrong trousers:

Wallace finds himself in the wrong trousers

Wallace really should have asked for Gromit’s help in getting his measurements correct.

As mentioned on the Stonehenge Casting FAQ, Arvold Casting has created some great videos on taking measurements publicly available on YouTube for both women to take their measurements as well as for men to take their measurements, so check ’em out.

(Please note: listing these links neither represents Stonehenge Casting endorsing Erica Arvold Casting nor Erica Arvold Casting endorsing Stonehenge Casting, so chill and enjoy the useful resource).

However, we’re guessing you know a lot of your measurements already — and you MUST fill in something in each of the 12 measurement fields — even if it’s “N/A” for “Not Applicable.” Let’s go down the list:

Hat
All of you have heads, as evidenced from your headshots. If you don’t know your specific size (e.g. “7 3/4”), you probably still know your general size (e.g. S, M, L) due to listening to your mother and wearing a hat during winter. Ideal would be to put both, for example “Men’s L (7 1/2).”

Jacket
For men, the most useful is if you know your suit jacket size. However, for both men and women, you can list your general size (e.g. S, M, L). Ideal is to list both your general size. Hey women, we’re about to ask men about their dress size, so all’s fair!

Shirt
Really, this is more your chest size for guys — and you should have this and your neck size on any dress shirts you own. Again, the general size (e.g. S, M, L) works in a pinch and both the general size and the measurement are ideal.

Glove
Again, if you listen to your mother about dressing warm, or you listen to Alton Brown about safe raw poultry handling, you should have some appropriate S, M, or L gloves around the house and know your general size. If you’re going for extra credit, you can measure your hands and list it in inches. Period wardrobe people will love you for this.

Bust/Waist/Hips
Women, please check the video above if you’re uncertain of these measurements. Accurate measurements mean wardrobe staff doing a rush fitting are happier.

Men, you can go ahead and put “N/A” here.

Inseam
This is a straight-up measurement and, men, if you have any off-the-rack pants or jeans in your wardrobe, you absolutely should have this. Otherwise, check the videos above. Women, you can get away with “N/A” temporarily if “Trousers” is filled out, but wardrobe will want your measurement too.

Neck
This also a straight-up measurement. Men, if have a dress shirt, this will be one of the numbers. But for men or women, check the video above for an accurate measurement (many people wear a neck size too big).

Dress
Men, we will not hold it against you if you do not know your dress size. However, you need to find it out or put “N/A” in this field. It cannot be blank.

Sleeve
This is best done with the help of a friend. Check the videos above.

Waist
If you have off-the-rack pants or jeans, all you men should have this. Women can use the “waist” portion of their “Bust/Waist/Hips” measurement. For both men and women, using the videos above to get an accurate measurement which will make you and wardrobe happier.

Trousers
The bare minimum is a general size (S, M, L, etc.) or a woman’s size (4R, 5S), but the ideal is one of those sizes PLUS your waist and inseam. Stonehenge Casting has the storage space for those extra electrons of repeated information.

Shoe
Put your shoe size (“9”) or shoe size range (“9 or 9.5”). If you know it, put your width and gender as well just in case (“Men’s 9 D”).

There you go. Remember, Stonehenge Casting is used by producers for period pieces, training videos that use uniforms, and rush casting. All of these are reasons for profiles to have accurate, up-to-date measurements.

With just a little bit of time and effort, you can make sure all 12 of your measurement fields are filled out.

Best of luck in your acting endeavors and we hope to see many of you on set (and looking good in well-fitted costumes)!